6 oz Raw Unfiltered (No Treatment) New Haven Vermont HONEY

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IMG_2059.JPG

6 oz Raw Unfiltered (No Treatment) New Haven Vermont HONEY

11.00

This is the honey I use in the jams. It is honey extracted from bees kept by renowned beekeeper Kirk Webster who works in the same town as V Smiley Preserves. He is what’s called a “no treatment” beekeeper, which means the bees are not being treated with miticides or chemicals. If you want to better understand the thought process, check out the “additional info” section below.

The 2018 harvest was largely made possible by alfalfa and Japanese knotweed blossoms. This particular harvest is quick to crystallize and it solidifies into a fudgy, silky texture. The color is on the darker side but the flavor is still light. It has the perfect sugary flavor ideal for preserving (and letting the fruit flavor shine) and will be perfect in your tea, coffee or drizzled over toast or cheese.

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Kirk’s bees are maintained year-round in Vermont.

This is text from Kirk ( I get a shiver down my spine every time I read it):

“For the entire time I have been a full time beekeeper, this fascinating industry and pastime has been in a state of constant change—brought on by the arrival of tracheal and varroa mites. We all experienced losses and setbacks due to these pests, but in the end we need to learn from them, and let them show us how our apiaries are unbalanced and poorly adapted. From the tracheal mites I learned how to rapidly propagate a new generation of resistant stock, and have tested nucs for sale in the spring. These methods have now proven to be essential for overcoming the varroa problem as well. In 1998, I began gradually withdrawing mite treatments from the apiary, and no treatments of any kind have been used since April 2002. This process was very costly at times, but not nearly so costly as continuous use of miticides and other drugs. Untreated bees and varroa mites, living together over many generations, are essential for selecting good breeding stock and fostering a creative co-evolution. New research in microbiology is showing that—wherever we take the trouble to look—microorganisms play a far greater role in regulating all living systems than we had any idea of previously; and that indiscriminately killing the micro flora and fauna of any system is a grave mistake. This, together with my own experience, training and observations of many other apiaries has convinced me that only beekeeping based, one way or another, on total non-treatment will provide bees that are truly healthy, resilient, and well adapted to their environment in the future.”